The web offers a lot of information on pathway design - from proper widths to pages full of photos and ideas. While useful, sorting through all of this information can be an overwhelming challenge. That's why we've put together this round-up of the best information on garden paths from across the web.

Add Plants to Your Pathway
From Houzz

Soften the space between stepping stones or pavers with a splash of green. When selecting a groundcover for a pathway make sure that you can walk on it, that it won't grow too tall and that it is appropriate for your climate. Houzz recommends six groundcovers for between pavers: Irish moss, turf grass, creeping thyme, elfin thyme, baby tears and dwarf mondo grass. See more pictures and read the article at

Create a Journey
From Sunset

According to landscape architect Michael Buccino, a successful path leads with authority, guiding the eye to attractive features along the way. Place attention grabbing plants near the path or an interesting piece of garden art. The goal is to get people to slow down or even stop to enjoy the scenery. To highlight certain elements at night, use strategically places path lighting. Learn more about Buccino's 3 elements of a great path at

Increase Visual Interest with Curves
From Better Homes & Gardens

A curved walkway is more interesting and enticing than a straight path. Bends in a curved path provide perfect opportunities for showing off interesting plants. Try a tall flowering variety that will hide the rest of the path and create a sense of mystery. See 10 more path photos at

Install a Weed Barrier
From Garden Design

Michael Donnellan, a NY landscape Designer, recommends installing two layers of landscape fabric between a path's compacted base and its top four inches of gravel. He also suggests using a walkway edging material along a garden path. Both of these are precautions against pesky weeds popping up in the middle of your path. See all four of Donnellan's steps for laying your own path at

Vary Your Pathway Materials

Create an eclectic path by using a mixture of paving materials. A casual pairing of stone and brick is especially appropriate for a cottage style garden. Designer Jamie Durie combined stone, wood and rebar to create a path with interesting texture and color. See all nine walkway pictures at

Related Information:

Walkway Pictures
Garden Path Shape
Walkway Width

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